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11 results for gardens found within the Blog

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.'. Elfin the Oak .'.

Posted by danielemiddleton on 18th January 2012 in london-history | kensington-park
The Elfin Oak of Kensington gardens has been added to the list of buildings of special architectural or historic interest following a recommendation from English Heritage. It has been listed in Grade II.Announcing the listing of the Oak, Heritage Minister Tony Banks said:"The Elfin Oak is a wonderful curiosity, loved by Londoners and visitors alike. It also has considerable historic interest. Sculpted by children's book illustrator Ivor Innes between 1928 and 1930, the Oak belongs firmly to the late Victorian interest in Little People which culminated in J M Barrie's Peter Pan. The Oak complements the statue of Peter Pan by Sir George Frampton which Barri...
 

.'. Thurloe Square .'.

Posted by danielemiddleton on 12th December 2011 in london-history | boot-scrappers, coalholes, iron-bells
I was just thinking the other day that I haven't seen any 'new' bootscrapers for a while; just the same designs repeated over and over. I walk about mentally saying, 'got that one, got that one' (how sad!).But I had to go for an interview at South Kensington and I had some time before it so I went for a walk and I came accross to Thurloe Square, a traditional garden square in South Kensington.There are private communal gardens in the centre of the square for use by the local residents. But what really makes Thurloe Square special is all the old features that you still can see around the houses and you can spott lots of lovely bits of ironwork along the street...
 

.'. POSTMAN's PARK .'.

Posted by danielemiddleton on 20th January 2011 in london-history | burial-site, horror-stories, listed-buildings
I believe that many girls have seen this Park in that film: Closer. But this isn't why I like this place so much. The reason I LOVE this place is because it was made by my favourite victorian artist George Frederick WattsIn 1887 Watts wrote to The Times proposing a project to mark Queen Victoria's Jubilee of that year. He believed that stories of heroism could uplift and stimulate and should therefore be commemorated. As his idea was not taken up he created the memorial himself in the form of a 50ft long open gallery situated in the public gardens on the site of the former churchyard of St. Botolph, Aldersgate.On the southern boundary lay the General Post Office...
 

Coal Hole Poems...

Posted by danielemiddleton on 29th December 2011 in london-history | pavement-poetry
Incline your head, passer-by, and peruse what you see. With some danger from passing perambulators. Not to mention incontinent sparrows and pigeons. here is a long thin coiling around. It isn't a centipede, but an unrhymed poem - Free verse at that! What is it there for - Only to prove what a cultured place. This town of ours is - isn't it? (John Heath Stubbs) While looking for a coffee shop at Notting Hill, few months back, at Stanley gardens I found this lovely coal hole just at the pavement of what seems to have been a antique shop. There lonely was this poem waiting to be admired. But only today I found out that a very artist group came across an idea and...
 

.'. Christ Church Greyfriars .'.

Posted by danielemiddleton on 22nd January 2011 in london-history | demolished-buildings, gardens, horror-stories, listed-buildings, queens-kings, secret-london
The first church on this site was built for Franciscan Friars (Grey Friars) in the 13th Century.After the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the 16th century, the church was renamed Christ Church.Destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666, the Church was rebuilt by Christopher Wren. Unfortunately, it was then left in ruins by bombing in World War II. Today, only the steeple remains. There is a rose garden among the ruins.All seems tranquil and peaceful - but beware, as many restless ghosts are said to frequent this churchyard.The most infamous ghosts to have been seen haunting this area, are said to be those of two beautiful murderesses, who are buried here at Greyfriar...
 

.'. The Licensed Victuallers' Asylum .'.

Posted by danielemiddleton on 10th October 2011 in london-history | burial-site, listed-buildings, victorian
In 1827 the Licensed Victuallers' Asylum was founded, on six acres of freehold land lying just off the Old Kent Road. It consists of a group of onestoreyed houses, chapel, chaplain's residence, board and court rooms, library, &c., set round two green lawns. The Duke of Sussex was its first patron in 1827, and he was succeeded by the Prince Consort, on whose death the Prince of Wales assumed the office. The idea of establishing an institution wherein the distressed members of the licensed victuallers' trade, and their wives or widows, might be enabled to spend the latter part of their days in peace and quietness, was conceived by the late Mr. Joseph Proud Hod...
 
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